Harland and Wolff - Shipbuilding and Engineering Works



1853
The first ship to be built at the yard - The Venetian
1854
In 1858 EJ Harland purchased Robert Hickson & Company shipyard and renamed it Edward James Harland & Company.
1862
On January 1st 1862, Mr. Harland took his chief draughtsman, Mr. Gustave Wilhelm Wolff, into partnership.
1874
Walter Henry Wilson became became a partner in the firm.
1874
William James Pirrie was taken into partnership by the two founders of the firm, Edward Harland and G. W. Wolff.
1895
Sir E.J. Harland dies at his residence, Glenfarne Hall, near Enniskillen, from heart disease, on 23rd December 1895, in his sixty-fifth year.
1904
Walter Henry Wilson died suddenly on a train between Portstewart and Portrush on 14th May 1904, in his sixty-fifth year.
1911
Govan Yard Opens
1912
Lancefield Works Purchased
1913
Gustav Wolff died on 17 April 1913 at 42 Park Street, London. He had been suffering from a serious internal complaint for some time.
1919
Company takes over A&J Inglis
1924
Harland & Wolff opened new works at North Woolwich
1924
Lord Pirrie was returning from a voyage to Buenos Aires, recuperating from pneumonia, when he died at sea.
1930
New Chairman - Fredrick Rebbeck
1941
The chairmanship went to Charles Palmour from the accountancy firm who were Auditors of the Midland Bank.
1961
Govan Yard Closes
1962
A&J Inglis Closes
1962
New Chairman - John S Baillie
1965
Denis Rebbeck followed his father Sir Frederick Rebbeck as Chief Executive of Harland & Wolff.
1966
The largest oil rig launched in the UK. The Sea Quest was built for BP and launched on the 8th January 1966.
1966
In exchange for a 1.5 million pounds loan in 1966, the government effectively assumed control of the company, appointing John F. Mallabar as chairman and financial controller.
1970
Sir John Mallabar announced his resignation as chairman in March 1970 and was replaced by J.R. Edwards. By December 1970 Edwards resigned as Chairman.
1971
On 6th July 1971 the Minister of Commerce for Northern Ireland, announced the position of Chairman of Harland and Wolff as Lord Rochdale
1971
Goliath Commisioned
1972
North Woolwich Works Close
1975
The British Government acquired all the company shares. The yard was not nationalised because it was a special Government funded yard.
1980
It was announced on 31st October 1980 that Mr. V. A. Cooke, had been appointed Chairman of the Company to succeed Sir Brian Morton.
1981
On 16th April 1981 it was announced that Dr Vivian Wadsworth, had been appointed Chairman of the Company for a period of three years with effect from 1st May.
1982
The Government announced the appointment of a new chairman and chief executive John Parker.
1989
The company was bought from the British government in 1989 in a management/employee buy-out in partnership with Fred Olsen; leading to a new company called Harland and Wolff Holdings Plc
2003
Last ship
Anvil Point completed


Timeline